Authorities in Nevada said that they will be questioning more people in connection with the death of a woman who worked in a Las Vegas salon. Authorities mentioned they will be looking into the cryotherapy industry because of the apparent accident that took the life of the woman. The investigation now includes a look into how dangerous it is for workers in these establishments and the devices responsible for this treatment.

Cryotherapy puts people in a situation where their bodies are exposed to very cold temperatures to aid in their recovery from physical trauma. Some places even claim that their machines can remove asthma, stop bone problems, aid in combatting obesity, and increase sexual urges.

But when Chelsea Ake-Salvacion, twenty-four years of age, died in an accident inside a cryotherapy machine back in October, people began to ask questions on how safe and regulated cryotherapy actually is.

Even though operators of this therapy advertise that cryotherapy is safe, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can find no health advantages from it. There is no regulating being done by the FDA on cryotherapy as well.

Steve George of the Industrial Relations Division of Nevada says that the cryotherapy industry is not regulated as of the moment. He and his co-workers are cooperating with authorities from the department of health in the investigation.

Deborah Kotz of the Food and Drug Administration did not comment on George’s statements. She said however that the FDA is worried that cryotherapy chambers that have not passed the standards of the agency will be available in the market.

Full-body Cryotherapy

Early use of this therapy targeted body parts with damaged tissue which was either malignant or benign. But then a procedure came up which required the person to expose his or her entire physique to extremely cold temperature, which is made possible by using liquid nitrogen.

People enter a chamber where it could fall to negative three hundred degrees Fahrenheit. Those running these businesses claim that the low temperatures make the blood flow in such a way that it helps the inflamed areas.

Full-body therapy takes one hundred eighty seconds, which operators believe is ample time for the physique to reap the benefits without experiencing any side effects.

Whole body cryotherapy sessions usually take only around three minutes to finish, which is considered to be enough time to allow the body to benefit from the therapy without suffering any adverse effects.

Gordon Giesbrecht, a professor at University of Manitoba mentioned that because our physiques are muscle and organ-filled, three minutes is not enough time to change its temperature.

But Giesbrecht noted that injuries related to being exposed to extremely cold surroundings can still happen.

He also said that at minus seventy, skin that isn’t protected or covered can experience frostbite in as short as a hundred twenty seconds. But nobody has tested humans at minus three hundred yet.

The Case of Chelsea

In a statement released by LVPD, Chelsea Ake-Salvacion tried to use a machine in her place of employment after work hours. This of course was not allowed by owners of the establishment. It is believed that she lost consciousness after inhaling the fumes from the nitrogen. She froze to death, and her body was discovered the following day.

There was nothing to indicate foul play. The whole thing was ruled as an accident.

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